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Woe is Me, Where do I Start

REPRINT FROM THE INTEGRAL NEWSLETTER

Homeowners approached me to come and look at their home that they purchased a few years ago. The history of repairs or replacement was unknown, so they wanted to know how they should go about bringing what they considered a money pit up to good condition as it was beginning to show its age.

 

After inspecting their home let me say that it is in good condition for its age. They have certainly maintained it quite well but it is coming of age whereas some of the building components are reaching their life expectancy and need attention.

 

We can see why there is confusion in the prioritizing of work to be completed. It does get confusing when trying to sort out what one wants as a wish list and what is necessary to do immediately or within a few years.

 

The home has 1,524 square feet of completely finished floor area with another 395 square feet of partly finished floor area. The question is do they complete finishing off 395 square feet of partly finished floor area as part of the prioritizing? If the budget allows we would say yes because it will add value to their personal worth as well as make the home more functional.

 

For human comfort, safety, and for a healthy environment, any repairs or restoration that addresses the building envelope or building services must take priority. In doing so, it may even mean improving the quality of product as well which may show up on the wish list. So anyone would have to weigh the pros and cons of improving the quality of product or finish.

 

For example, ask yourself do you want to live in the home long term or are you only going to stay there a few more years. This would make the difference of in replacing the roof with composite shingles which is on the roof right now and would mean in another 15 or so years you would have to replace the roof cover again, or replacing the roof with a corrugated metal baked finish roofing material that would probably last about another 40 or 50 years. If they are going to remain in the home for a short term, then the metal roof is really part of a wish list.

 

Also let me point out that when anyone is getting into major updating like they intend to, be prepared to spend more that the budget allows. We have never seen a restoration project come in on budget. The closest has been 10 % over. There are a multitude of reasons why this occurs such as hidden damage, last minute ideas and changes, influences of other parties as to what you should do etc.

 

Often overlooked, is who manages the restoration site? This is usually a more critical decision than who does the restoration work. Without competent supervision, contractors and the inevitable construction problems that arise during a project can quickly cause the restoration work to get out of control. Most restoration projects are site managed by the restoration contractor. Letting the contractor have a “free rein” to make decisions may seem harmless, until you consider the consequences.

 

When a restoration contractor is placed in a bid situation, this usually means stripping away restoration details that could be considered frivolous but are still part of the quality of construction that was there.  Saving money on the project costs is now the contractor’s priority.

 

Restoration project site management requires extensive and diverse restoration experience. Assessing the conditions, scoping the damage, and estimating the cost of the restoration correctly, the site manager should be able to have the project completed in an efficient and timely manner, staying within the original contracted budget.

 

With that said, lets prioritize the work to be done. The order of priority is:

First Stage
Second stage
Third Stage
Last Stage

 

The building envelope is first on our list of priorities. It comprises of anything that will keep the elements outside and the controlled temperature inside. In their particular case, we are concerned with the garage ceiling insulation, the roof cover, the roof sheathing, and the deck because it is tied into the roof and is leaking.

 

DECK

 

Our approach to the deck is to attach it to the house rather than cantilever it out from the house. This will minimize any damage to the stucco. It will be redesigned to accommodate enclosed exterior storage under the floor area, redesigning of the staircase, tying in the deck roof with the main roof, and designing the railings to accept glazed and screened units at a later date.

 

1. Permits $500
1. Demolish existing structure and carry to dumpster $325
1. Provide Dumpster, Haul to Dump, Dump Fees $700
1. Excavate for new storage slab under deck & landing piers, install

forms & sonic tubes, install vapour barrier, install gravel base,

install reinforcing, pour slab, concrete pumping, install saddles

$1,925
1. Install posts for floor joist beam, install floor joist beam, install floor

joists, bolt frame work to residence, install joist hangers, install floor

deck, install posts for roof structure, install roof structure beam,

install roof joists, install sub fascia, install roof sheathing,

install railings, install staircase and landings

$4,450
4. Install chain link fencing to enclose area under deck, install chain link gate $775
4. Replace deck railings with screen and glass enclosure $6,625
1. Restoration Management Fees this section $1,250

 

Please note the roof cover, aluminum fascia, soffits, and gutters are included in the Roof Section. The painting of this structure is included in the Exterior Finish Section.

 

ROOF

 

Our approach to the restoration of the roof which now leaks is to strip off all existing roof cover and apply a new roof cover. We recommend that snow and ice shield is installed rather than 15 # or 30 # felt paper under the new roof cover because it gives the roof added protection should the roof cover leak at any time. When we change a roof cover from a previous application, it usually means that we must make adjustments to some of the other finishes such as fascia, soffits or gutters. When we replace a roof cover all new flashings, vents, etc. are replaced under the roof cover budget.

 

1. Strip off all finishes to roof, and existing aluminum fascia and

carry to dumpster

$225
1. Repair all roof sheathing, replace all flashings, replace all roof turbines, replace all roof vents, replace all stack flashings, install ice and snow shield to roof deck, install baked enamel finished corrugated steel roofing to deck, install roof edging to roof cover $6,700
1. Replace aluminum gutters & downspouts, replace aluminum soffits to new exterior deck, replace aluminum fascia $1,250
1. Restoration Management Fees this section $1,250

 

EXTERIOR FINISH

 

This section addresses the exterior walls and painted areas.

 

2. Seal cracks and paint stucco, seal and paint new deck complete with floor, ceiling, walls, railings, posts, beams, stairs, etc., Seal and paint all exposed trim $2,625
2. Restoration Management Fees this section $400

 

GARAGE

 

2. Remove ceiling, install vapour barrier, install insulation, drywall ceiling, texture ceiling $1,225
3. Repair, seal and paint walls $550
4. Supply and install workbench and shelving unit to rear corner $1,250
2. Restoration Management Fees this section $200

 

DRIVEWAY

 

2. Cut asphalt at base of driveway for new catch basin, excavate for new catch basin, form for new catch basin, reinforce for new concrete, pour new concrete base and walls, install grid, connect to sump pump $975
4. Replace asphalt driveway $2,875
2. Restoration Management Fees this section $150

 

ELECTRICAL

 

In their case they mentioned that they had a family member who is an electrician and I will include a normal budget for this section for their perusal. The rewiring can be done in stages. The main floor should be changed as you progress into each room while doing other renovations. This way if walls have to be opened up they can be done at that time. Leave the basement rooms that are unfinished until the very last and the recreation room until the last of the rooms are complete upstairs.

 

3. Permit $150
3. Rewire residence that has existing aluminum wiring $4,800
4. Move service box $1,250

 

PLUMBING

 

They indicated that there is no real concern with the plumbing fixtures and they can be changed as they so desire. The problem they seem to be having is that suds are discharging from a rough in for a sink nearby. It is our suggestion that you have all the drains cleaned out mechanically in order to move any slug that remains in them. This would include interior and exterior perimeter drains. If any are blocked then the person doing the drain cleaning usually has a camera and can send it down to find out why these drains are blocked. After cleaning the drains it may be necessary to have the septic tank pumped out again due to objects floating on the surface.

 

1. Clean drains $500

 

HEATING

 

The furnace had just been replaced and air conditioning added. The gas fireplaces along with the furnace should be serviced each year which will keep the efficiency of the unit in good order. Although they mentioned updating the fireplace in the recreation room, we would suggest that it be checked for efficiency by the gas fitter required to repair the collar on this unit.

 

1. Service fireplace in living room and recreation room, repair

fireplace collar and flue in recreation room

$500

 

FLOOR COVERING

 

When you change material it sometimes requires additional work which is what will be required in this case. So I am going to take each room by room for the budgeting of work. If you are rewiring as well in the room, some drywall repairs will also be necessary and if you are changing the floor then some painting may be necessary as well. So let’s go room by room.

 

LIVING ROOM / DINING ROOM / HALL / ENTRY

 

This is a large area and one room flows into the other room so we will take all as one.

 

4. Replace carpet with laminate flooring $2,825
4. Replace existing baseboards with new baseboards, seal and paint

baseboards

$575
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $1,225
4. Seal and paint walls $1,250
4. Replace carpet and lino on staircase and landing with quarry tiles $725
4. Remove dining room window and install patio door to porch $1,525
4. Restoration Management Fees $1,225

 

CENTER BEDROOM including closet

 

4. Replace carpet with laminate flooring $775
4. Replace existing baseboards with new baseboards, seal and paint

baseboards

$175
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $525
4. Seal and paint walls $425
4. Restoration Management Fees $300

 

END BEDROOM including closet

 

4. Replace carpet with laminate flooring $775
4. Replace existing baseboards with new baseboards, seal and paint

baseboards

$175
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $525
4. Seal and paint walls $425
4. Restoration Management Fees $300

 

MASTER BEDROOM including closet

 

4. Replace carpet with laminate flooring $775
4. Replace existing baseboards with new baseboards, seal and paint

baseboards

$175
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $525
4. Seal and paint walls $425
4. Restoration Management Fees $300

 

MASTER BEDROOM ENSUITE

 

4. Replace lino with quarry tile including new underlayment $850
4. Replace existing baseboards with matching baseboards $100
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $300
4. Seal and paint walls $300
4. Restoration Management Fees $250

 

MAIN BATHROOM

 

4. Replace lino with quarry tile including new underlayment $850
4. Replace existing baseboards with matching baseboards $100
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $300
4. Seal and paint walls $300
4. Restoration Management Fees $250

 

KITCHEN / EATING AREA

 

4. Replace lino with quarry tile including new underlayment $2,250
4. Replace existing baseboards with matching baseboards $150
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $475
4. Seal and paint walls $475
4. Restoration Management Fees $500

 

BASEMENT HALL

 

4. Replace lino with quarry tile including new underlayment $725
4. Replace existing baseboards with matching baseboards $100
4. Restoration Management Fees $125

 

RECREATION ROOM

 

4. Replace carpet with laminate flooring $2,800
4. Replace existing baseboards with new baseboards, seal and paint

baseboards

$300
4. Repair drywall (estimated) $1,000
4. Seal and paint walls $1,025
4. Restoration Management Fees $775

 

NEW LAUNDRY ROOM WITH BATHROOM AND UTILITY SCREEN

 

4. Install new partition walls $625
4. Renew insulation to exterior walls $325
4. Install t bar ceiling complete $1,200
4. Install drywall to walls $2,000
4. Seal and paint walls $850
4. Install quarry tile to floor $3,250
4. Install baseboards to match $250
4. Install room entry door unit to bathroom $550
4. Install sliding screen units to utility area $575
4. Install toilet, complete with rough in shut off valve and seat $975
4. Install vanity unit $525
4. Install vanity sink, faucets, drain, shut off valves and rough in $575
4. Install bathroom accessories including towel bar, tissue holder,

medicine cabinet, mirror, etc.

$500
4. Restoration Management Fees $1,800

 

NEW BEDROOM

 

4. Renew insulation to exterior walls $200
4. Install t bar ceiling complete $450
4. Install drywall to walls $925
4. Seal and paint walls $425
4. Install laminate to floor $775
4. Install baseboards, seal and paint baseboards $175
4. Restoration Management Fees $450

 

Please bear in mind that the materials are not of economy or average quality, they are of good quality which corresponds with the current quality of their home. Each home is unique in its requirements; therefore, a qualified professional should be retained to complete an inspection, budget and schedule of this nature.