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Types of Roofs Explained

REPRINT FROM THE INTEGRAL NEWSLETTER

GABLE ROOFS

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Photo 1: This is a gable. The entire triangular area and trim is called a pediment. The triangular wall surface is called the tympanum.

Photo 2: Technically the word “dormer” applies only to the window itself. The house like structure, which contains the window is called a gablet. This dormer window is a double-hung unit.

HIP ROOFS

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Photo 3: A rectangular hip roofs are often called Spanish Tile roofs because the practice of using moulded clay units as roof coverings originated in the Anadalusian Region of Spain.  They typical exaggerated ridge caps and the exposed rafter tails under the fascia.

Photo 4: A square hip roofs are often called Cottage roofs because their ability to shed snow and rain from all four equal elevations.  They typical are metal or composite shingled and found in “cottage country”

Photo 5: These are called Dutch Hip roofs because of the unique style found in Holland. The bottom base is a hip designed roof, while the top is a gable roof.

Photo 6: These are the same style of dormer except that the roof portion is a hip roof.

SHED

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Photo 7: A residence covered with a series of shed roofs. The window strip over the porch roof is called a clerestory.

GAMBREL ROOFS

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Photo 8: If you look closely you can see that the actual roof style here is gambrel. Two shed dormers springing from the knuckle joint of the gambrel roof complicates the design.

Photo 9: This type of roof is also commonly referred to as a Barn roof because the shape of the roof is so widely associated with Barns in North America.

MANSARD ROOFS

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Photo 10: This mansard roof is covered by wood shakes. It will be a flat surface on top and it is also commonly referred to as a Flat roof.

PAGODA ROOFS

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Photo 11: This Pagoda roof is covered in metal panel embossed tor resemble wood shakes and coloured with baked on enamel. It is similar to a Hip Dutch roof in design except instead of the Gable top it has a Mansard top.

VICTORIAN ROOFS

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Photo 12: Typical Victorian Style roof is steep; commonly has circular eaves, very cut up in design and detailed overhangs.

Photo 13: The cylindrical structure in the left is called a turret. There is a palladium window on the upper floor above the porch roof. Note: The projected window bays on either side of the decorative masonry chimney. The siding shown on this elevation is coursed wood shingles.